Posts Tagged ‘politics’

Fears have been raised that criminal offences could go unreported after it was revealed that the Metropolitan police has been referring victims of crime over to the Home Office for immigration enforcement.

Read the full article here.

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“In the race to rent?” That’s what the advert from Rightmove asked at my local bus stop. It made me angry – housing is a right, not a race. But in the last two decades, instead of building housing for people, we’ve built a housing crisis. One which renters are at the sharp end of.

Read the full article here.

Back in 2010 I wrote a Masters’ Degree thesis on the rise of the Far Right in India (and an Open Democracy article). From a Development Studies perspective, it was a contradiction as to why an economically successful and democratic post-colonial state such as India could create and sustain a massive Far Right movement. Since then, I’ve been following political developments in Burma as they try to transition towards more democratic government. The recent rise in attacks on minority groups in Burma, and the rise of Far-Right groups prompted me to write an article looking at the similarities between these movements in India, Burma, and Sri Lanka.

Far right religious nationalism is growing in South Asia. Fuelled by the experience of colonialism, the resulting internal tensions since independence, and powerful civil society movements. Read the Full article here.

For four years I was a City Councillor, serving on the opposition benches under an incredibly frustrating Cabinet system. Here’s an article I written for the Guardian on councils abandoning the ‘Cabinet system’ and returning to the ‘Committee System’.

“Committees are back in local government. Despite the idea once being derided for creating camels instead of horses, a small but influential group of councils are returning once again – under the powers of the Localism Act – to the system of collective decision making by an appointed group.” Read more here. 

An article Heather McRobie and I wrote for OpenDemocracy reflecting on the events we saw as Sixth Form students, and the long shadow cast by Iraq and the War on Terror.

“The demonstration on February 15, 2003 was the largest protest march in British history, but failed to stop the invasion of Iraq.  A reflection on how the protest, and the war, shaped a decade of politics and culture.” Read more here.